Momentum Podcast: 231

The Effect Of Strategic Planning With Sterling Griffin

by Alex Charfen

Introduction

Last week, I had massive, overwhelming anxiety. Here's why, I was sick. I was actually sick from before the 1st of July, until about Saturday or Sunday, so over seven days. 

Episode Description

Today I met with Sterling Griffin and his COO Amber Morningstar. The day was extraordinary. We spent a full business day planning the future of LifeChanger, Sterling’s company. 

This is an activity that entrepreneurs rarely participate in and it was the first time in Sterling’s career he ever spent a full day planning. Here are the results, reactions, and Amber and Sterling’s impression of where they are going next.

I'm Alex Charfen, and this is the Momentum podcast, made for empire builders, game changers, trailblazers, shot takers, record breakers, world makers, and creators of all kinds. Those among us who can't turn it off and don't know why anyone would want to. We challenge complacency, destroy apathy, and we are obsessed with creating momentum so we can roll over bureaucracy and make our greatest contribution. Sure, we pay attention to their rules, but only so that we can bend them, break them, then rewrite them around our own will.

We don't accept our destiny, we define it. We don't understand defeat, because you only lose if you stop and we don't know how. While the rest of the world strives for average and clings desperately to the status quo, we are the minority, the few who are willing to hallucinate there could be a better future and instead of just daydreaming of what could be, we endure the vulnerability and exposure it takes to make it real. We are the evolutionary hunters, clearly the most important people in the world because entrepreneurs are the only source of consistent positive human evolution, and we always will be.

The effect of strategic planning. Today, I have a pretty intense opportunity to share with you in a unique way that I haven't before on this podcast, because I spent the day with Sterling Griffin and Amber Morningstar from Life Changer. We did a one day strategic coaching day, and it's a practice that I've done for decades of spending a focused day in strategic planning with an entrepreneurial business.

As you've heard me say before, less than 1% of companies do any type of forward strategic planing. It's really one of the most important things you can do in your business. Today, I get the opportunity to showcase for you how Sterling and Amber feel now that we've been through a one day, and really what it was like to go through the process. Sterling, you know, planning is not really something most entrepreneur know how to do. Would you agree?

Sterling G.:

It's not our natural [inaudible 00:02:11]. I'll speak for myself is like, I've learned to love planning because it moves us forward as entrepreneurs and business owners, but it's like, I'm naturally a just do it now or don't do it kind of person. It's either done now or it's never done, rather than strategically figuring out in order of priority what needs to happen first.

Alex Charfen:

Yeah, is it typical in your business career for you to spend an entire day like we did today only in the act of strategic planning?

Sterling G.:

This has happened in my entrepreneurial career a grand total of zero times, so no.

Alex Charfen:

You never have the instinct of slowing down enough to really do that. Right? Somebody has to point out that it's a necessity. It had to be an interesting decision for you to say, "Okay, I'm going to spend eight hours doing this." Why'd you make the decision?

Sterling G.:

Well, I think in business there are certain stages of growth in a business, and early on for me it helped to be just more action oriented because I could learn more quickly just by doing something, trying it, and moving on. As my company has grown and as we're serving more people, that type of attitude where it's like, we just take action, everybody takes random action and figures out on their own, just leads to a lot of like, starting and stopping rather than forward movement. It's that old saying, is what got you here won't get you there.

Once you get to a certain size of an organization, you have to, or I'll speak for myself. I've had to take more steps back and reflect more, think more, because thinking more is what's going to empower my team to get the right strategy they need to mover forward. I'm learning to love planning, and this was one of my favorite days in business because I feel so, not just clear, but as entrepreneurs, clarity is safety and progress. It is safety and progress. I feel more safe now in my business and more that I'm progressing, because I now not just have the plan for what I'm doing, but for what the rest of my team is doing as we look ahead.

Alex Charfen:

Sterling, you know, I often share with entrepreneurs that when you put the right amount of time into planning and you bring the right team around you, that empowers you at this level where you feel an entirely different stage of momentum. I joke around, it's kind of like when Iron Man puts on his suit, because when you go from working by yourself, which you did recently. You're like, an incredibly fast growth entrepreneur. You've only been doing this a couple years, right?

Sterling G.:

Two and a half years I got first client. Yeah, I was broke.

Alex Charfen:

Two and a half years, and now you've got a multimillion dollar company with hundreds of clients. You did that quick. Tell us about that. This has been a huge transformation for you.

Sterling G.:

Yeah, I think that what's enabled me to grow quickly is that I don't get attached to doing something a certain kind of way. This is why, like, you've been so pivotal in my growth at this next phase is because my attitude is, when I get to a certain level in business, if I ever start to feel the tiniest bit of plateau, what I need is not to try more things, I need to work with somebody who has already got the plan. I need to get the strategic plan.

I have become addicted to mentorship, to receiving support, so that someone just tells me literally, "Step one, do this. Step two, do that. Step three, do that." Instead of trying to figure out everything, which is what slows an entrepreneur or anybody down, I could just get the blueprint and execute that. I've fallen in love with execution, rapid execution via mentorship. I think that is the number one thing that's helped me push forward and helped my clients move forward of course as well.

Alex Charfen:

I want to come back to the mentorship. Now, with executing a plan like this, with sitting down and putting in this time, are you starting to feel a little bit of that Iron Man effect?

Sterling G.:

Heck yes. Heck freaking yes. I call it Batman effect, it's the Batman effect.

Alex Charfen:

We all have what we call it. Yeah, tell us a little bit about what that feels like, because Sterling, here's the transition you've been through that is so hard for an entrepreneur. It's going from doing it all ourselves to crossing this chasm where we start letting other people in to making this massive leap, which you recently made, from letting people in and letting them do stuff for you, to actually letting people be responsible for things within your business, for letting people drive outcomes in your business, for not even knowing how they're doing it, but trusting that they'll get there in your business. That's not an easy move to make, is it?

Sterling G.:

Well, it certainly hasn't been easy for me, but I think that I have ... It's interesting, before I started building a team I had this negative belief around working with other people. I learned this through living my life around unsuccessful entrepreneurs. Some of the people in my family are unsuccessful entrepreneurs so I took on their belief systems automatically when I became one.

I had this terrible belief, which is if you want something done right, do it yourself. That is the belief of the baby, the whiny, the lower entrepreneur. When I started to take on a team and started to work with a team, and what helped me grow rapidly through working with amazing team members is I exchanged that belief for, if I want something done right, I need to do it through others. It needs to be done through others, through excellent true believers is a word that you use which I've learned from you and I absolutely love.

In taking on that new belief that if I want something done right I need to empower other people, I need to find somebody that's a specialist here, it's enabled me to take a step back and actually do less in my business that is not my genius, that's not my gift. I feel like as an entrepreneur, I need to be doing more things that are strategic, more time thinking, more time communicating and influencing and less time in the different kinds of work, like video editing work and the coaching and all the sales.

I need to be more the trainer and the empowerer, the visionary of the organization and have everybody else do everything else. When I was able to see that that was the best thing I could do, not just for the growth of the business but that enables us to change more lives. I was like, I'm so on board, I have to figure this out. That's when I came to you and thank God I did.

Alex Charfen:

Sterling, how long have we been working together? I just want to get context. I'm terrible with time. How long has it been?

Sterling G.:

It's mid-May now, and we started in mid-January, so that's four months, five months?

Alex Charfen:

Yeah, okay, so about five months, okay. How many people did you have when you started and what type of growth have you experienced in that five month period?

Sterling G.:

I think seven people when we started, and then now we have 13.

Amber M.:

14.

Sterling G.:

14 full time.

Amber M.:

Yeah, so we've doubled.

Sterling G.:

Yeah, so we've doubled our size in team members. Our revenue I think in January was somewhere around, it was like 100,000 was January's revenue, and then like, the over the last three months we've averaged 300k per month. No, we averaged just over 220, so yeah, it was like more than doubled in that amount of time.

Alex Charfen:

Congratulations, that's huge. That's so awesome. We just heard Amber answer a question, so I want to bring you in now Amber. Just, can you tell everyone what you do for Sterling and what your position is in the company?

Amber M.:

Sure. I function as the COO and I basically help Sterling with any of the projects and processes going on in the company in terms of hiring/recruiting, as well as project management and managing the team overall.

Alex Charfen:

Amber, do you also help him with the communication cadence?

Amber M.:

Yes. I've implemented that and it's been one of, like, the biggest game changers for us. Yeah, I love having the cadence. It is very pivotal for any business. I highly recommend it.

Alex Charfen:

Tell us why. Why has it been such a game changer for you in your position as operating the company?

Amber M.:

I like structure and I like having clear, transparent outcomes. The cadence really provides that and that's one thing that I've always communicated to Sterling, is that if we want the team to follow us where we're going they need to know where that is. Having the cadence set up the way that it is, it gives the team knowledge of what we plan to do so that they can believe in it and see the steps forward that they need to take to help contribute to the bigger picture.

Alex Charfen:

That's huge. Sterling, most entrepreneurs struggle with structure and process and meetings. Why is the cadence different? You just looked really excited when I said you know, you help apply the cadence.

Sterling G.:

Well, I was the person that ran from structure. I'm the person that naturally just is spontaneous, I want to do what feels good in the moment, I'm very emotionally driven, a little bit of Italian in me. When I came up against the Charfen cadence, I mean, let's just be real for a second, I was resistant to implementing it the first couple months in the program. That was one of my biggest mistakes is not just doing what you freaking said, doing what I was paying you to tell me to do. As soon as we implemented it it was like, not only did I find myself becoming more productive, because now I have a scoreboard, I have a way of being held accountable by the rest of the team, frankly, I'm held accountable to not just doing something but getting clear on what's most important every single week, every single day.

Then, even better than that, I feel so much more connected to the rest of my team now because we have a process now where we not only communicate with each other about what we're working on, but a process where we acknowledge one another. That's my favorite part of the whole thing is like, the consistent acknowledgement that we give to one another. I feel like I'm able to, because I'm not just acknowledging my team randomly, but acknowledging them around results that they're creating, they become so much more productive, so much more efficient and drive so much more results, both for them but also for our clients in the process.

Alex Charfen:

Has it felt like constraint to you? Here's what most entrepreneurs believe, and I struggle with his. I have to convince people that having meetings on your calendar almost immediately, if you do it right, will feel like you have more of your time back. That, if you commit this time to your team you'll actually feel a much higher level of freedom and a much higher level of safety, like you said. Has that happened for you?

Sterling G.:

Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, for me, I basically take the approach, what enables us, because I'm freaking nutzo. Like, I love growing this business. I want to serve more people, change more lives, do it rapidly, be an inspiration to others and have our people be an inspiration. I'm basically like, whatever gives us the best results and allows it to be the most fun and easy, feel the most fun and easy, let's do that. I will adapt my preferences towards what's most effective.

What's felt almost magical about this cadence, is it's allowed me to not only experience structure in a way that felt really liberating, but it's enabled my team to feel much more connected and supportive of one another, and of course enables us to be more effective. I was the person that was resistant to structure, but as soon as I just stopped like, trying to make the structure fit me and I moved myself to fit the structure, I felt so much more free and at home.

Alex Charfen:

Yeah, that's huge. I know so many people are listening and thinking like, "Is he for real?" Most entrepreneurs don't even like to use the word structure more than once and you just did a whole bunch of times.

Sterling G.:

Yeah, yeah.

Alex Charfen:

Amber, how has having that consistent cadence improved your ability to work with Sterling and help run this company?

Amber M.:

With Sterling being more of the visionary, I think he has a lot of really great ideas, but having the cadence allows us to move those ideas forward to completion, so they aren't just ideas that get talked about and then never brought into realization. Having the ability to really sit down with the staff and plan out what we want to accomplish and what it's going to take in order for us to get there, allows us to make sure we're checking those boxes off every single week and moving the company in the direction that he ultimately wants it to go. It also gives all the team members clear outcomes on what they need to do to contribute to that. Nobody ever feels lost. There's stability because we know where we're headed, and everybody knows what they're responsible for, which I feel we didn't necessarily have that clarity before implementing the cadence.

Alex Charfen:

Sterling, one of the biggest challenges that entrepreneurs have is like, in that early team building phase, each person you add becomes more overwhelming. What I explain to people is, if you're willing to implement a cadence, each person you add will actually feel like you're getting more done and it'll get easier. Has that happened for you?

Sterling G.:

Abso-freaking-lutely. Abso-freaking-lutely. I remember thinking about hiring before and it was like, "Well, how are we going to manage this person? It's going to feel like ..." Obviously, Amber, you were the one that was doing a lot of the managing then, and you worked like freaking bananas, but it was still starting to get overwhelming even with just eight people or seven people that we had on the team. Since we've implemented the cadence I'm like, we can double and triple and this thing will work at that level too.

Amber M.:

Yep.

Sterling G.:

It's like, not only has it given me just joy in the moment, but it's given me abso-freaking-lute certainty that we can grow this and we'll still have a process, which allows our people to be managed effectively, super productive, and keep us all in ease and flow as we grow.

Alex Charfen:

Yeah that's huge, that's huge. Amber, for you, as the team's grown, just explain to anybody who is listening how much easier it is to manage a larger population when you have consistency in communication?

Amber M.:

It is so much easier. When we were first onboarding people, it felt very disorganized. Having a system to bring people through makes me feel a lot better because I can be more organized and I feel like I'm bringing somebody onto a team where they're going to understand exactly what they're responsible for and what they need to get done. With the most recent person that we've onboarded with the full 90 day onboarding process, he has thanked me up and down, I can't even count how many times, for how much support that he has and how much clarity he has on what he needs to get done so he knows exactly what he needs to do and we really are putting people in a position to succeed that way, because there's complete clarity around what they're responsible for.

Alex Charfen:

One of the other things that I tell entrepreneurs is that the average entrepreneur without a cadence, without a forward looking planning structure and a communications cadence is spending between 50 and 75% of their time just leading the team and moving things forward. When you were back at eight people without a communications cadence, do you think you were somewhere around there

Sterling G.:

Yeah, well, I mean the thing is, I work more than the average person. I was working like, 70 hours a week or whatever. I still do that now, but also it's because I like to, not because I have to, I just like to do it. I spend so much more of my time not in management mode but in creative like, how do we move the company forward, type of mode. If an entrepreneur, which I think a lot of people get stuck at this way, right about the million or couple million dollar level they're like, "I literally can't work more. Like, I'm literally doing as much as I can and I'm being as effective as I know how, but I just feel like we're not breaking past this barrier."

It's at that point, just like it was at several stages below, like, you have to change the way that you work. You have to change the way that you run your team. Thankfully, I found the cadence when I did. I found you and therefore the cadence when I did, because I was able to like, work very differently and, like, my team felt so much more clear. I mean, you remember Amber, where it was back in January it's like, nobody knew what was going on. It was like management was a pain in the butt. We were super frustrated. You were working around the clock, I was working around the clock and we still felt like not everybody's clear and knows their projects, has clear outcomes. I was feeling to myself like, we could be so much more productive, what is missing? Now I feel like we are way more productive than I thought we could be. That's the way that I am now. It's all a function of the cadence.

Amber M.:

Yeah, I would agree.

Alex Charfen:

You said something interesting today about a project management software, Asana. You said like, "I'm so glad we don't have to be in Asana anymore."

Sterling G.:

Oh my gosh, yes.

Alex Charfen:

Some of the clients that I work with do have project management software, but one of the things that I explain to people is, you know, project management software is a function of the last 10 or 15 years. It is so complicated and so difficult to use and so confusing that most entrepreneurs get lost in the software and so does the team. If you pull out of there and start communicating with your team in a system, you don't need project management software. No one believes me. They always look at me funny and they're like, they can't imagine how they could possibly give up Asana or Base Camp or Trello or At Task or any of the things that I've seen people use. You are one of these transitions off of Asana. Tell us what's that been like, Sterling.

Sterling G.:

It's been one of the great joys of my life. To be free of Asana forever. You know, it's funny, because I'm standing here with Amber and she can make anything work. We had Asana going and she's like, "Oh, Asana's great," because she was recommended that by somebody else. It's like, literally any software you give Amber she'll just freaking like, crush it. She's like, "Oh, it's so easy." She'll come to the rest of the team like, "It's so easy. You just do this and this and this." The rest of us are staring blankly at her like, "Duh." We just don't get it. I'm just a little bit slower when it comes to tech stuff like that.

I remember, even early on with you I was like, "How do I run this business without Asana or any project management software?" I was talking with the Lady Boss crew at the first event that was earlier this year, and they were like, "Yeah, we just do Voxer and like, Google Sheets and the cadence." I was like, "That sounds like heaven has met earth." As soon as they said that, seriously, as soon as they said that I'm like, "That is what we have to do. Whatever it takes, I'm going to find out how to run a business like that."

The same day I Voxered you Amber, and the same day I was like, "We have to figure out how to do Google Sheets and Voxer and that's it." You were skeptical at first. You were like, "Asana's so amazing." I'm like, "Asana is not amazing. Please, please can we try this?" As soon as I brought her the cadence she was like, "Okay, I see how this can work. As long as we use the cadence we can work outside the project management software." I'm not kidding, this is one of the greatest things we've ever done is like, find a way away from Asana. Thank God. Thank any higher power, whatever, that we don't use it anymore.

Alex Charfen:

I'm the same way. I've had these in my business, and the first company I ever ran it grew to over nine figures on spreadsheets, so that's why we built the cadence like we did, because it's so much easier. Amber, I often share with people that like, most project management software has created a burden in just the management of the software that slows the entire business down. Since you've pulled it out of the company, what have you seen in productivity?

Amber M.:

I would totally agree. I think as well too, to Sterling's point, everybody has different strengths and learning curves and using a software like Asana, it was just difficult for the rest of the team. Where, switching to Google Sheets is something very intuitive. There's beauty in the simplicity of it. It's something that everybody understands, and for that reason you don't spend so much time trying to teach people the software. You hit the ground running and people already know how to use what's being implemented, so you can be much more effective.

I was a big believer in project management software prior to implementing the cadence. When I looked over the cadence and explored how that connected with using Google Drive, Google Sheets and all of that instead, it made sense to me and it was almost like a light bulb went off in my head. I thought, "This is what we need. This is so much better because it will be easily implemented and the team will follow it." It doesn't matter how many features a project management software has if your team doesn't know how to use it nor cares to use it. It just becomes redundant and you're there trying to manage the software instead of manage your team.

Sterling G.:

Yeah, yeah.

Alex Charfen:

That's such a great point, Amber. Everyone listening right now who runs a team is like, "Okay, I want to hire Amber." I guarantee you they're like, "What did he say her last name was?" They're right now going back to the beginning. I often tell people like, just because someone else is a true believer on that team and they work there, doesn't mean they would somewhere else. I have really, two questions for you. One is, do you agree that you have to be a true believer to be productive on a team? Then the second question is, how did Sterling find you?

Amber M.:

Yes, I 100% agree you have to be a true believer if you want to be effective on a team. If you're not a true believer, you can be on a team but you won't feel fulfilled and you won't be effective. It's not a winning situation for either party. How I found Sterling was, I was actually a client in his academy. I think that that's very key, because I obviously believed in what he was doing, what his mission was, otherwise I wouldn't have joined in the first place. That's what brought us together and now here we are.

Alex Charfen:

Sterling, what has it been like to have a client working with you? What has that experience been like working with Amber?

Sterling G.:

It's been like a dream come true. We were just talking on the way up the stairs here in your office like, I feel like I'm the luckiest guy in the world. That not only did I get to hire a client, but I got to hire an absolute superstar to be on my team. I feel so, I literally, you don't know this, but I write in my gratitude journal pretty much every morning and night, like, I'm so grateful for Amber and how much she adds value to this team, how much she cares, how productive she is.

I feel like it's as much yours as it is mine the way that you treat the company, and most importantly you treat our team and our clients. You treat them as if they're your own children. They're your own children that are not as smart as you and are trying to figure it out, that you're very patient with, myself included. I'm talking mainly about myself here when I say that. Yeah, it's been an absolute joy and I'm so grateful.

I have several of my clients have actually started working with me. It's amazing because I feel like, you don't need to hire true believers to be on your team, but you also don't need to have a successful business either. My thing is, first of all, try and create a business that you can be truly passionate, that you can be like, just over the moon excited about and driven to succeed in. Then you're going to attract other people that are driven about that same mission too. As the entrepreneur, your responsibility primarily is to hold the vision, and then to find other people that believe in the vision and that can help create it with you. If you try to do it alone, good freaking luck.

Alex Charfen:

No doubt. One more question Sterling, and this one's for you. This is specific. When you came to our event in person, one of the things that you and I had to have an extended discussion around was pulling the target closer. You had had this habit of when you were on your own of setting really, kind of impossible goals. The challenge was, you also had this habit of meeting those impossible goals, but repeatedly in an almost odd way. You came into entrepreneurship really like, knocking it out of the part coming from a very humble place. You've made a significant shift here. What has that done for you and your team by pulling the target closer?

Sterling G.:

I was resistant, man. I think that was on display pretty clearly at your event. I was like, "No, we're going to set even more unrealistic goals for everybody. My whole team's going to be super motivated just like me and we're going to make it happen." Which is ...

Alex Charfen:

He totally did.

Sterling G.:

I did. I was real emotional, too. I was really emotional, because like I said, the Italian. You helped me see is that the way that I am as the visionary, I am driven by the unreasonable. Most people, even high performers, most super high performers, which my team is full of them, they're driven by a goal that they can actually visualize themselves seeing, that makes sense, that makes logical sense.

When we had that conversation at the event, it was like, the thing that you said to me that changed everything was like, "Stop believing that your whole team is full of people like you. Stop thinking that everybody is just like you. Not everybody on your team is an entrepreneur and does the things that seem normal to you." That is, I think, one of the pivotal transitions for me from high performer to leader. It's easy for me to just like, do a lot of stuff, but it's a completely different paradigm to actually empower other people, to create an environment where other people can succeed, produce, and love what they do. Kudos to you on helping me see that and fighting through the angry, not angry, but argumentative-

Alex Charfen:

No, it was pretty angry.

Sterling G.:

vAll right, all right. Call it like it is, call it like it is.

Alex Charfen:

Amber for you as the COO, because so often a team is put in a position where they are told, "Here's this crazy goal to go chase," and I know you've been in that position. What has it been like to ...

Sterling G.:

Most of her time working with me was like that.

Alex Charfen:

What has it been like now that the targets are pulled closer, how much more are you getting done with the team?

Amber M.:

I mean, having the target set really far out from what you would think that is possible is something that I'm used to even from my old employment in corporate. Getting Sterling to be on board with setting something realistic was really relieving to me because it made me feel empowered to set the team up to win. I think that having the team feeling like they are able to win is what's going to help drive momentum in the business to get you past the goal that you're even setting for them. It's been a complete eye-opening experience to actually have that be brought to reality and see how the team has responded to it.

I've always wanted that sort of structure, but I've never had that. I've always had the pressure of, "We have to hit this unrealistic goal, you have to make it happen no matter what." Kind of taking that step back, reassessing, and setting a goal that made more sense that set the team up to win has just completely changed the dynamic of the team, the attitude towards coming to work and getting everything done that needs to be done. People come to work knowing that we're going to crush the goal. As opposed to, setting a goal too far out, there's that uncertainty and instability and people don't like to have that. Giving them that stability and knowing it's going to happen gets them excited, makes them passionate and motivated to continue to show up powerfully every single day.

Alex Charfen:

Here's what's crazy though. You guys have gone in the last five months from just over a million dollar run rate to almost a three million dollar run rate. In that time frame that you pulled the targets closer, your team has just crushed it.

Sterling G.:

Yeah, accelerating.

Alex Charfen:

When we had that argument, you had a number in mind. That number is now actually kind of visible from where you are. Isn't it?

Sterling G.:

Yeah, yeah, definitely, yeah, totally. It's ironic, because it's like, maybe I might have my own secret number in my mind of what I think is possible, but it's like with my team, I'm like, "Hey, here's a number that I know we're all going to hit and that you obviously will know that we can hit too, that you feel good about." Maybe in my mind I'm pushing for something else and I'm pushing for something that I think is still like, it seems reasonable to me but impossible to like, pretty much anybody else. That combination of both what pushes me, which is what I say for myself and what pushes my team, what I say for them and what we communicate publicly, that combination is what enables us to grow freaking really fast. Freaking really fast, like, doesn't make sense, you put those words together like that, but that's how excited I am right now.

Alex Charfen:

Sterling, it's been awesome to spend the day with you and Amber, I really have enjoyed it too. I think it's going to be interesting to watch where you are today and where you are in about 90 days. The amount of planning and forethought and insight that you had into what your clients need and what they're looking for today was amazing. If somebody wants to know more about you Sterling, now that they've heard you and listened to you, I'm sure they're going to want to find out where they can get more, hear more, understand more.

Sterling G.:

Come hang out at sterlinggriffin.com. Just come hang out there. Check out my story, see if it resonates with you. I would recommend you just keep learning from this guy, for sure. This guy, Alex Charfen, is changing lives every single day, creating momentum. Thank you, man, for the awesome day. I'm so grateful that I get to work with you.

Alex Charfen:

I appreciate it brother. If you are interested in understanding how you can apply a cadence to your business, if you want more information on where you are as an entrepreneur, go to billionairecode.com, answer a few questions, a member of my team will get back to you. We'll also send you a report of where you are in the billionaire code, what your business needs next, and why you may be plateaued so you can focus exactly where you should be right now. Billionairecode.com.

Full Audio Transcript

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